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Posts tagged “Valley Forge

FEB. 18 – President’s Day-George Washington’s Birthday

American Minute with Bill Federer

FEB. 18 – President’s Day-George Washington’s Birthday

President’s Day is officially George Washington’s Birthday, who was born FEBRUARY 22, 1732, but the Uniform Monday Holiday Act of 1968 moved its observance to the 3rd Monday in February.Washington was unanimously chosen as the Army’s Commander-in-Chief, unanimously chosen as President of the Constitutional Convention, and unanimously chosen as the first U.S. President.

As General, Washington acknowledged God after victories throughout the Revolution and as President thanked God for the Constitution, October 3, 1789:

“Whereas it is the duty of all nations to acknowledge the Providence of Almighty God…

I do recommend…rendering unto Him our sincere and humble thanks, for…the favorable interpositions of His Providence…we experienced in the course and conclusion of the late war…for the peaceable and rational manner in which we have been enabled to establish constitutions of government.”

Get the book, Prayers and Presidents

Washington was Anglican, and after the Revolution, Episcopalian.

His great-great-grandfather, Rev. Lawrence Washington, was an Anglican minister in Essex, England, who lost his position when the Puritans won the Civil War.

Washington’s great-grandfather, John Washington, immigrated to Virginia and became a planter, politician, and militia leader, who even had a local Anglican church renamed “Washington” in his honor. John Washington left to the church of a tablet with the Ten Commandments..

Washington’s grandfather, Lawrence, was

Anglican, as was his father, Augustine, who served as a vestryman at the Anglican Truro Parish.

George Washington became vestryman in Truro Parish, and was godfather in baptism to a niece and several nephews.

Washington had the Declaration of Independence read to his troops, then ordered chaplains placed in each regiment, stating July 9, 1776:

“The General hopes and trusts, that every officer and man, will endeavour so to live, and act, as becomes a Christian Soldier, defending the dearest Rights and Liberties of his country.”

General Washington wrote at Valley Forge, May 2, 1778:

“To the distinguished character of Patriot, it should be our highest Glory to laud the more distinguished Character of Christian.”

To the Delaware Indian Chiefs who brought three youths to be trained in American schools, General Washington stated, May 12, 1779:

“You do well to wish to learn our arts and ways of life, and above all, the religion of Jesus Christ.”

On October 2, 1775, General George Washington issued the order:

“Any…soldier who shall hereafter be detected playing at toss-up, pitch, and hustle, or any other games of chance…shall without delay be confined and punished…The General does not mean by the above to discourage sports of exercise or recreation, he only means to discountenance and punish gaming.”

On February 26, 1776, General Washington issued the orders:

“All…soldiers are positively forbid playing at cards and other games of chance. At this time of public distress men may find enough to do in the service of their God and their country, without abandoning themselves to vice and immorality.”

On July 4, 1775, General Washington ordered:

“The General…requires…observance of those articles of war…which forbid profane cursing, swearing and drunkenness; And.. .requires… punctual attendance of Divine Services.”

As recorded in The Writings of George Washington (March 10, 1778, 11:83-84, U.S. Government Printing Office, 1934), General Washington ordered:

“At a General Court Marshall…Lieutt. Enslin of Colo. Malcom’s Regiment tried for attempting to commit sodomy….and do sentence him to be dismiss’d the service with Infamy. His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief approves the sentence and with Abhorrence and Detestation of such Infamous Crimes orders Liett. Enslin to be drummed out of Camp tomorrow morning by all the Drummers and Fifers in the Army never to return.”

In his Farewell Address, 1796, Washington stated:

“Of all the dispositions and habits which lead to political prosperity, Religion and Morality are indispensable supports.

In vain would that man claim the tribute of Patriotism, who should labor to subvert these great Pillars of human happiness.”

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Infantry of the Continental Army.

Image via Wikipedia

Driven into Pennsylvania by the British, the Continental Army set up camp at Valley Forge, DECEMBER 19, 1777, just 25 miles from British occupied Philadelphia. Lacking food and supplies, soldiers died at the rate of twelve per day. Of 11,000 soldiers, 2,500 died of cold, hunger and disease. A Committee from Congress reported “feet and legs froze till they became black, and it was often necessary to amputate them.” Soldiers were there from every State in the new union, some as young as 12, others as old as 60, and though most were white, some were African American and American Indians. Quaker farmer Isaac Potts reported seeing General Washington kneeling in prayer in the snow. Hessian Major Carl Leopold Baurmeister noted the only thing that kept the American army from disintegrating was their “spirit of liberty.” In a letter written to John Banister, Washington recorded: “To see men without clothes to cover their nakedness, without blankets to lay on, without shoes, by which their marches might be traced by the blood from their feet…and at Christmas taking up their…quarters within a day’s march of the enemy…is a mark of patience and obedience which in my opinion can scarce be paralleled.”


News and Commentary (via Crosswalk)

Young Marquis de Lafayette

Image via Wikipedia

Tuesday, September 6, 2011 Email Send to a Friend   Mobile Mobile   Free Newsletters Free Newsletters
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Born SEPTEMBER 6, 1757, his father died before he was two-years-old and his mother died when he was twelve, leaving him to inherit their fortune. At fourteen-years-old, he joined the French Military and, at age 16, became a captain. He married Marie Adrienne Francoise de Noailles, whose family was related to King Louis XVI. At 19, against the King’s wishes, he purchased a ship and persuaded several French officers to accompany him to fight in the American Revolution. Washington appointed him a major general. His name was Marquis de Lafayette. He fought at Brandywine, endured the freezing winter at Valley Forge, saw action at Barren Hill and Rhode Island. Lafayette returned to France and, along with Franklin’s efforts, secured troops and supplies for the American cause which helped force Cornwallis to surrender at Yorktown. Nearly fifty years later, after having lived through the French Revolution, Lafayette was guest at a ceremony at Bunker Hill, Massachusetts, along with 200 Revolutionary Veterans. Secretary of State Daniel Websterspoke: “God…has allowed you to behold the reward of your patriotic toils; and He has allowed to us…in the name of the present generation…in the name of liberty to thank you!”Enjoy more newsletters like this one at Crosswalk.com


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