About these ads

Attempting to obey God and follow Jesus Christ our Lord

Science

The Lake That Turns Animals That Touch It Into Statue-Like Creatures (No, Really) | Video | TheBlaze.com

The Lake That Turns Animals That Touch It Into Statue-Like Creatures (No, Really) | Video | TheBlaze.com.

They look like dusty statues, but the photographs of animals — mostly birds — taken by photographer Nick Brandt were once vibrant, living creatures.

Their fatal mistake? Taking a dip in Lake Natron. Read the rest and watch the video at: The Lake That Turns Animals That Touch It Into Statue-Like Creatures (No, Really) | Video | TheBlaze.com.

About these ads

Nature editor questions “the religion of science”

Nature editor questions “the religion of science”.


A Valve Inside a Valve: A New Heart Valve Can Be Implanted in People Suffering with Adult Congenital Heart Disease Without Open Heart Surgery via Newswise

Released: 6/24/2013 12:00 PM EDT
Source Newsroom: Methodist Hospital, Houston

Newswise — Many adult congenital heart patients have undergone multiple heart surgeries by the time they reach their 20s. Each time surgeons operate on the heart, the risk of complications increases. A new valve recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration, now gives these patients a new way to manage their disease without having to undergo open heart surgery.

Many adults with congenital heart disease are born with a malformation of the pulmonary valve, which sits between the heart and lungs. Most have undergone open heart surgery during childhood to restore blood flow to the lungs, and often require a second and third open heart surgery to replace this valve. Because of advancements in heart surgery over the past 50 years, more and more of these patients are making it to the adulthood for the first time in history.
The new Melody Transcatheter Pulmonary Valve, which is delivered through a catheter and requires only a small incision, is a new technique that is bringing new hope to these patients.
The first Melody Valve at Methodist DeBakey Heart & Vascular Center in Houston was recently implanted by Dr. C. Huie Lin, an adult congenital heart disease specialist, in a young man who had already had three open heart surgeries for congenital heart disease. Read the rest at Newswise!

Enhanced by Zemanta

Wired Space Photo of the Day | Wired Science | Wired.com

Wired Space Photo of the Day | Wired Science | Wired.com.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Discovery of wound-healing genes in flies could mitigate human skin ailments | KurzweilAI

I never thought that I would find a reason to like flies, but this article has me thinking of them in a new way. God has a reason for everything and perhaps we are finally beginning to realize that even flies are important!

Discovery of wound-healing genes in flies could mitigate human skin ailments | KurzweilAI.

Biologists at UC San Diego have identified eight genes never before suspected to play a role in wound healing that are called into action near the areas where wounds occur.

Their discovery, detailed this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE (open access), was made in the laboratory fruit fly Drosophila. But the biologists say many of the same genes that regulate biological processes in the hard exoskeleton, or cuticle, ofDrosophila also control processes in human skin.

“Many of the key molecules and proteins involved in Drosophila wound healing are involved in mammalian wound healing,” says Rachel Patterson, the first author who published the paper with Michelle Juarez and William McGinnis, a professor of biology and interim dean of the Division of Biological Sciences. “The genetics of Drosophila are not as complicated as mammalian genetics, so it’s easier to attribute specific biological functions to individual genes.” Read the rest at Discovery of wound-healing genes in flies could mitigate human skin ailments | KurzweilAI.


Bringing people back from the dead | KurzweilAI

Bringing people back from the dead | KurzweilAI.

A doctor says people can be revived several hours after they have seemingly died, BBC News reports. Should this change the way we think about death?

“While 45 minutes is absolutely remarkable and a lot of people would have written her off, we now know there are people who have been brought back, three, four, five hours after they’ve died and have led remarkably good quality lives,” says Dr Sam Parnia, the director of resuscitation research at Stony Brook University in New York. Read more at Bringing people back from the dead | KurzweilAI.


3D printer makes tiniest human liver ever | KurzweilAI

3D printer makes tiniest human liver ever | KurzweilAI.

Lab-grown livers have come a step closer to reality thanks to a 3D printer loaded with cells, New Scientistreports.

Created by Organovo in San Diego, California, future versions of the system could produce chunks of liver for transplant.

The mini-livers that Organovo made are just half a millimeter deep and 4 millimeters across but can perform most functions of the real thing.Read more at 3D printer makes tiniest human liver ever | KurzweilAI.

Watch video at http://bcove.me/x9tub6fr


Nanosponges soak up toxins released by bacterial infections and venom | KurzweilAI

Nanosponges soak up toxins released by bacterial infections and venom | KurzweilAI.

Engineers at the University of California, San Diegohave invented a “nanosponge” capable of safely removing a broad class of dangerous toxins from the bloodstream — including toxins produced by MRSA, E. coli, poisonous snakes and bees.

These nanosponges, thus far studied in mice, can neutralize “pore-forming toxins,” which destroy cells by poking holes in their cell membranes. Unlike other anti-toxin platforms that need to be custom-synthesized for individual toxin type, the nanosponges can absorb different pore-forming toxins regardless of their molecular structures. Read more: Nanosponges soak up toxins released by bacterial infections and venom | KurzweilAI.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Wired Science Space Photo of the Day | Wired Science | Wired.com

Wired Science Space Photo of the Day | Wired Science | Wired.com.

A CTX image shows topographic cones in local depressions on Mars. What are these and how did they form?

This image reveals “rootless cones,” which form on lava flows that interact with subsurface water. They are in depressions because subsequent lava flowed around the base of the cones, then “inflated.” Lava inflation is a process where liquid is injected beneath the solid (thickening) crust and raises the whole surface, often raising it higher than the topography that controlled the initial lava emplacement.

This scene is in Amazonis Planitia, a vast region covered by flood lava. The surface is coated by a thin layer of reddish dust, which avalanches down steep slopes to make dark streaks.


New injectable hydrogel encourages regeneration and improves functionality after a heart attack | KurzweilAI

 

New injectable hydrogel encourages regeneration and improves functionality after a heart attack | KurzweilAI.

University of California, San Diego bioengineers havedemonstrated in a study in pigs that a new injectable hydrogel can repair damage from heart attacks, help the heart grow new tissue and blood vessels, and get the heart moving closer to how a healthy heart should.

The gel is injected through a catheter without requiring surgery or general anesthesia — a less invasive procedure for patients.

There are an estimated 785,000 new heart attack cases in the United States each year, with no established treatment for repairing the resulting damage to cardiac tissue.

Lead researcher Karen Christman, a professor in the Department of Bioengineering at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering, said the gel forms a scaffold in damaged areas of the heart, encouraging new cell growth and repair. Because the gel is made from heart tissue taken from pigs, the damaged heart responds positively, creating a harmonious environment for rebuilding, rather than setting off a chain of adverse immune system defenses.

“While more people today are initially surviving heart attacks, many will eventually go into heart failure,” said Christman.  “Our data show that this hydrogel can increase cardiac muscle and reduce scar tissue in the region damaged by the heart attack, which prevents heart failure. These results suggest this may be a novel minimally invasive therapy to prevent heart failure after a heart attack in humans.” Read the rest at New injectable hydrogel encourages regeneration and improves functionality after a heart attack | KurzweilAI.

 


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 2,991 other followers